MEETING LOCATION
CLICK ABOVE for a map to our meeting location, Knights of Columbus hall, 200 Fair Haven Road, Fair Haven

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SPECIAL NOTICE
Beginning in 2018 Wendy Malmid will step down as Programs Chairman. We are looking for a volunteer to plan our programs for the 2018-2019 season, which starts in September of 2018. Work with Wendy, who will show you the ropes. Help keep our organization alive and growing! Contact Us for more information.

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Wed., Oct. 11, 8:00 pm
NJ Bald Eagle Project
Robert Somes

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Wed., Nov. 8, 8:00 pm
Return of the Raven
Rick Radis

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Wed., Dec. 13, 8:00 pm
Avian Rehabilitation, or How to Live with a Loon in Your Bathtub
Giselle Smisko

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Wed., Jan. 10, 8:00 pm
Travels in Peru
Kevin Watson

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Wed., Feb. 14, 8:00 pm
American Kestrels
William Pitts, NJ Fish & Wildlife

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Wed., Mar. 14, 7:00 pm
FAMILY NIGHT!
Back Into Nature Wildlife

Risso's Wildlife Discovery
(please note early start time)

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Wed, April 11, 8:00 pm
My Journey with a Pair of Great Horned Owls
Pamela Dimeler

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Wed., May 9, 8:00 pm
The Impact of Habitat Loss on Avian Biodiversity, from the Amazon to the Eastern United States
Jacob Socolar

 



Learn about the "NJ Bald Eagle Project" at Audubon meeting October 11

Bald eagle
Zoologist Rober Somes will present "The NJ Bald Eagle Project" at the Monmouth County Audubon Society meeting on Wednesday, October 11 at 8 pm. The program will be held at the Knights of Columbus hall, 200 Fair Haven Road, Fair Haven. The public is welcome; admission is free.

The presentation will be an overview of the New Jersey Bald Eagle Project. New Jersey was once home to more than 20 pairs of nesting Bald Eagles. As a result of the use of the pesticide DDT, the number of nesting pairs of Bald Eagles in the state declined to only one by 1970 and remained at one into the early 1980s. Use of DDT was banned in 1972 -- that ban combined with restoration efforts by biologists within the NJ Division of Fish and Wildlife's Endangered and Nongame Species Program (ENSP) acted to increase the number of New Jersey Bald eagles to 150 active pairs in 2015 and 199 young produced. Conserve Wildlife Foundation of NJ and ENSP biologists work together to manage and reduce disturbance in eagle habitats, especially around nest sites.

During the summer of 2014 two juvenile bald eagles were fitted with a GPS tracking device (a wearable backpack). ENSP biologists chose one eagle from Atlantic County (a male) and one from Cumberland County (a female) to be tagged in this telemetry study. Then in May 2015 a juvenile male from a nest in Cumberland County was fitted with another GPS transmitter. The data collected will help shed light on the life-cycle of non-breeding eagles and can be used to protect communal roost sites under the Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act. So far the tracked NJ birds have ranged from Canada to Virginia and Eastern Long Island.

Robert will also discuss the improvement in digital camera technology and how this has enabled the NJ Bald Eagle Project to receive more band resightings and photographs than ever.

The presenter, Robert Somes, is a Senior Zoologist with the NJ Division of Fish and Wildlife's Endangered and Nongame Species Program. His primary projects are the Bald Eagle Project and rare insect conservation. He has worked for the Fish and Wildlife Service for 9 years. He has a Bachelor of Science degree in Environmental Studies from Stockton University and a Master's degree in Ecology from Rutgers University. He currently works out of the organization's Assunpink field office.

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P.O. Box 542 • Red Bank, NJ 07701
This site was last updated on 14 September, 2017
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